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Power transmission towers

Ah, the wonder of technology! I just discovered that for at least a couple of weeks, email messages from Photography on the Run’s contact form have been silently bouncing.

The contact form actually sent the messages, but  a downstream mail server was rejecting them. No notifications were generated and the messages were not quarantined. Effectively, the messages just vanished into the network ether. To make matters worse,  it looked like the messages were successfully sent.

I appreciate your feedback and respond to all emails that are not spam. The manner in which messages are sent from the form has been changed and  message delivery should now be more reliable.

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Caballero Canyon Sunrise

Marine layer spilling over the the crest of the Santa Monica Mountains into Caballero Canyon.

At the start of my run from the Top of Reseda (Marvin Braude Mulholland Gateway Park) the visibility above the fog-filled San Fernando Valley was at least a hazy 25 miles.

Ahead of another rainstorm, offshore pressure gradients had weakened and the onshore flow was rapidly increasing, pushing marine layer clouds into the coastal canyons of the Santa Monica Mountains and spilling over the low points of the crest.

Marine layer fog flowing between Rustic Canyon and Garapito Canyon
Marine layer fog flowing between Rustic Canyon and Garapito Canyon

My first stop was going to be Temescal Peak. This little peak is about 3.5 miles from the trailhead, near the junction of Temescal Ridge fire road and the Backbone Trail. It’s a nice way to start a run, and on a clear day it can have surprisingly extensive views.

Fog flowed over Fire Road #30 between Rustic Canyon and Garapito Canyon, but once through this ethereal river, it was clear all the way up to the Hub. I wondered if I was going to be able to see Mt. San Jacinto from the top of Temescal.

The answer to that question turned out to be no. In fact I could barely see my nose from Temescal Peak. In the 12 minutes it had taken me to get to the peak from the Hub the entire area, including the summit of Temescal Peak (about 2100′), had become enveloped in fog.

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Running Between the Raindrops

Boney Mountain from Serrano Valley
Boney Mountain from Serrano Valley

The misty rain had momentarily turned to sunshine. As I ran along the trail, rain-soaked sage glittered in a rainbow of colors. The peaks above me were still shrouded in gray clouds, but the sunlit valley below glowed bright and green. Streams that had been dry on New Years, now burbled and bubbled restlessly. My shoes and socks were soaked, not from stream crossings, but from the cold, wet grass overgrowing the trail.

Dense patches of shooting stars covered wet hillsides and milkmaids lined shady sections of trail. Paintbrush, Indian warrior, California poppies, larkspur, chocolate lilies, bladderpod, encelia, lupine, nightshade, wild hyacinth, phacelia, bigpod ceanothus and wishbone bush had also started to bloom.

The day not only encouraged the accumulation of miles, but of the sensations and emotions of the outdoor experience; and that feeling of well-being that emerges somewhere between the trailhead and the top of the last climb.

Here are a few photos taken along the way.

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Between January Storms

Upper Las Virgenes Canyon Open Space Preserve

From Saturday afternoon’s rain-free run to check out upper Las Virgenes Creek. The nearby Cheeseboro Remote Automated Weather Station (RAWS) had recorded about 2.0 inches of rain the previous three days and would record another 2.4 inches on the following two. The weather station is on top of the prominent hill in the distance. January was the wettest at Downtown Los Angeles (USC) since January 2005.

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Fallstreak Hole

Fallstreak hole south of Calabasas on January 21, 2017.

The oval disturbance in the layer of altocumulus clouds in this photograph is a relatively rare phenomenon called a fallstreak hole or hole punch cloud.

These altocumulus clouds are formed from super-cooled water droplets many times smaller than a raindrop. The droplets are in a liquid state even though the temperature is well below freezing. When disturbed by an aircraft passing through the layer the droplets freeze and precipitate out of the cloud as virga. This and other processes create the hole.

The photo was taken on Saturday, January 21, 2017 at 2:23 p.m. near the Las Virgenes trailhead of Upper Las Virgenes Canyon Open Space Preserve. The hole was well south of the area.

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Downtown Los Angeles and San Jacinto Peak

Downtown Los Angeles and San Jacinto Peak

Downtown Los Angeles, with San Jacinto Peak in the background, approximately 110 miles distant. San Jacinto Peak is a bit over 10,800 feet in elevation.

The photograph was taken from a viewpoint off the Temescal Ridge Trail while doing a loop from the End of Reseda to Will Rogers State Park earlier this month.

Some related posts: San Jacinto Peak and Tahquitz Peak Trail Run, Skiing San Jacinto, Mountain Weather

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Winter Colony of Crows in Cheeseboro Canyon

Winter colony of crows in Cheeseboro Canyon

With a storm approaching and rain only an hour or two away, I’d been debating where to turn around. I’d just climbed the steep hill between Upper Las Virgenes Canyon and Cheeseboro Ridge and decided to continue down to Cheeseboro Canyon. As I drew closer to the trail’s junction with Cheeseboro Canyon, I began to hear a cacophony of cawing crows.

At the junction crows literally filled the sky (video). It seemed the call was out and crows were coming from all directions to join the flock.

Though I’d never seen such a large aggregation in Cheeseboro Canyon, it is common for the American crows (Corvus brachyrhynchos) to form large foraging and roosting flocks in winter. Winter is tough on animals and isn’t surprising that the social and intelligent crow would cope with Winter in this cooperative fashion.

Leaving the crows behind I started the trip back to the Victory trailhead. It would take about an hour and I hoped the rain didn’t get there before I did!

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Images taken on trail runs, and other adventures, in the Open Space and Wilderness areas of California, and beyond. All content, including photography, is Copyright © 2006-2017 Gary Valle. All Rights Reserved.