Category Archives: backbone trail

Will Rogers – Rivas Canyon – Temescal Canyon Trail Run

Backbone Trail above Will Rogers State Historic Park
Backbone Trail above Will Rogers State Historic Park

The previous weekend I’d done an out and back run from the “Top of Reseda” to the Oak Tree on the Rogers Road segment of the Backbone Trail. It’s an enjoyable run I could do on one bottle of water and get back by mid-morning. Including Temescal Peak, the run was about 14 miles roundtrip, with about 1800′ of elevation gain/loss.

The Oak Tree on the Rogers Road segment of the Backbone Trail
The “Oak Tree” on the Rogers Road segment of the Backbone Trail

This weekend, I hadn’t expected to be back on the Backbone Trail and headed for the Oak Tree again, but last weekend’s run reminded me that I hadn’t done the Will Rogers – Rivas Canyon – Temescal Canyon/Ridge loop in a couple of years.

The 20+ mile loop is an outstanding trail run that is both challenging and scenic. Done clockwise from the Top of Reseda, the run down Rogers Road is as enjoyable as the climb out of Temescal Canyon is difficult. On paper, the elevation gain/loss is around 3400′, but for me the run is usually a bit more strenuous than that stat would suggest.

Century City, Downtown Los Angeles, San Gorgonio Mountain and San Jacinto Peak
Century City, Downtown Los Angeles, San Gorgonio Mountain and San Jacinto Peak

On the way out I usually do a short side trip to Temescal Peak, and on the way back a short detour to Temescal Lookout. With good visibility, both points have extensive, 360-degree views. Temescal Peak can be accessed from the Backbone Trail about 0.1 mile east of Temescal Ridge Fire Road via a use trail. Temescal Lookout is just off the Temescal Ridge Fire Road, about 0.5 mile north of the Trailer Canyon/Temescal Ridge Fire Road junction.

On a clear day, there is a long list of places and peaks visible along the route. Among them are Century City, Downtown, Santa Monica Bay, Palos Verdes, Catalina, Boney Mountain, Hines Peak, San Gabriel Mountains, Mt. Baldy, Santiago Peak, and sometimes San Gorgonio Mountain and San Jacinto Peak.

The steep climb on Temescal Ridge Fire Road up to Green Peak
The steep climb on Temescal Ridge Fire Road up to Green Peak

Water is usually available at Will Rogers State Historic Park at the restrooms adjacent to the main parking lot and polo field. I’ve also topped off my water at the Temescal Canyon trailhead. The Rivas Canyon Trail is used to connect Will Rogers SHP to Temescal Canyon.

Here’s an interactive, 3D terrain view of the Will Rogers – Temescal trail run. The map can be zoomed, tilted, rotated, and panned. For help controlling the view, click/tap the “?” icon in the upper right corner of the screen. Track and placename locations are approximate and subject to errors. Poor weather, and other conditions may make this route unsuitable for this activity.

Some related posts: Will Rogers – Temescal Loop, Christmas Eve Trail Run, Chilly Los Angeles, Century City Clouds and Sun, Downtown Los Angeles and San Jacinto Peak

Musch Meadow Frost

Frost along the Backbone Trail at Musch Meadow

As I approached Musch Camp, a scrub jay flew from a trailside faucet and into a nearby eucalyptus. There had been a little rain the day before, but the birds at the closed camp were still thirsty. Less than a quarter-inch of rain had fallen, and nearby creeks were still dry.

Melting frost
Melting frost “steaming” at Musch Meadow

I was doing a run from the “Top of Reseda,” and on a warmer day would have topped off my water bottle at the camp. I stopped at the faucet and briefly turned on the spigot. Maybe that would make it easier for the jay.

Leaving the camp behind, I continued south on the Backbone Trail, across frost-covered Musch Meadow. Early morning sun had just reached the meadow, and water vapor from the melting frost steamed in the cold air.

In another mile I reached the Trippet Ranch trailhead, and then begin the six mile run back to the Valley. At several points on the run there had been wintry views of the local mountains. On the way back the best view of the snowy mountains was from the Hub, where Mt. Baldy could be seen gleaming white in the morning sun.

Some related posts: Garapito Trail Runs, Musch Trail Mule Deer, Musch Trail Morning

Trippet Ranch Oak Grassland

Trippet Ranch oak grassland

Taken on today’s trail run from the “Top of Reseda” to Trippet Ranch and back.

Here’s a Cesium 3D interactive view of a GPS track of my usual route. Today I did the Garapito and Musch Trails on the way out, then ran the fire roads on the way back.

Some related posts: The Heavenly Ranch in the Hills, Garapito Trail Runs

A Windy Run, Walk, Ride, for Wildlife Research

Boney Mountain and Serrano Valley from Overlook Fire Road
Boney Mountain and Serrano Valley from Overlook Fire Road.

The Overlook Fire Road in Pt. Mugu State Park was nearly empty. I’d seen only two hikers between the top of the Fireline Trail and the top of the Wood Canyon Vista Trail. Maybe it was the wind. There had been 20-25 mph wind gusts much of the morning. Along the ridgelines, the gusts were even stronger.

Run, Walk, Ride 2020

I’d picked Pt. Mugu State Park to do a run in support of the Santa Monica Mountains Fund’s Run, Walk, Ride, for Wildlife Research. Many mountain lions have included Pt. Mugu State Park in their home range, including P-1, the patriarch of the mountain lions in the Santa Monica Mountains study.

According to the NPS website, the Santa Monica Mountains National Recreation Area is the world’s largest urban national park. Wildlife in the Park is affected by issues resulting from the proximity of urban and wild areas. Among the problems are poisoning from anticoagulant rodenticides, limited genetic diversity, and vehicular deaths. Only by studying Park wildlife can we better understand and manage these and other issues.

Because water is usually available at several spots in Sycamore Canyon, it’s a great place to do a self-supported ultra-length trail run.

A very windy Pacific and the Ray Miller segment of the Backbone Trail
A very windy Pacific

So far, today’s run had taken me from Wendy Drive in Newbury Park to Serrano Valley via the Old Boney Trail. I’d circled past the old ranch in Serrano Valley and then descended the Serrano Canyon Trail to Sycamore Canyon. A short jog south in Sycamore Canyon put me at the bottom of the Fireline Trail, which I’d followed up to the Overlook fire road.

Next up was a scenic loop in La Jolla Valley. After that, I would work my way back to the Upper Sycamore Trail via Sycamore Canyon. From there, it would only be a few miles back to the Wendy Drive Trailhead.

The Santa Mountain Mountains Trails Council has been hard at work. Even though they can’t currently accept volunteer assistance, it looked like the Old Boney, Serrano Canyon, and Upper Sycamore Trails had been recently maintained.

Some related posts: It’s Raining Mountain Lion Tracks!; Mountain Lion Tracks on Rocky Peak Road; Mountain Lion Saga; Reagan Ranch Bobcat; Hawk, Bobcat and Rabbit

Topanga Lookout From Topanga Ridge

Topanga Lookout From Topanga Ridge

This morning, did the Topanga Lookout Ridge loop, plus the twin summits of Saddle Peak.

California buckwheat along the Backbone Trail, east of Saddle Peak
California buckwheat along the Backbone Trail

Here’s what the Topanga Fire Lookout looked like in 1969.

For more info about the loop, see the posts: Topanga Lookout Loop, Plus Saddle Peak and Topanga Lookout Ridge Loop

The short service road at the top of Saddle Peak’s antennae-festooned west peak was closed when I did this run, but was open again on December 5, 2020.

Too Many Flowers on the Chamberlain Trail

Flower stalks of bleeding heart on the Chamberlain segment of the Backbone Trail
Flower stalks of bleeding heart on the Chamberlain segment of the Backbone Trail

After climbing the western ridge route on Boney Mountain and scrambling over Tri Peaks, I was trying to run down the Chamberlain segment of the Backbone Trail. Usually one of my favorite downhills, the trail was so glutted with the flower stalks of bleeding heart, it made running difficult. Here’s a video snapshot of one short section of trail.

During this second Spring following the Woolsey Fire, bleeding heart has become a predominant fire follower in the Boney Mountain Wilderness. Its rampant growth is reminiscent of the explosion of Poodle-dog bush in the San Gabriel Mountains the second Spring following the 2009 Station Fire.

Plummer's mariposa lily along the Chamberlain segment of the Backbone Trail
Plummer’s mariposa lily

Sticky snapdragon is another fire follower that has become especially prevalent this Spring. It is truly sticky, with rose-purple-colored flowers along a long stalk.

Other wildflowers seen along the way included Humboldt lily, yellow mariposa lily, Plummer’s mariposa lily, slender tarweed, and scarlet larkspur.

Some related posts: Fire Followers Along the Backbone Trail (May 2019); Wildflowers, a Waterfall, and Recovering from the Woolsey Fire (March 2019); Boney Mountain and Pt. Mugu State Park (December 2018)