Category Archives: topanga state park

Goat Peak and the High Point Trail From the Top of Reseda

Goat Peak and the High Point Trail
The High Point Trail

Like many that enjoy our local mountains, I’m always on the lookout for new trails, new peaks, and interesting loops. A couple of months ago, after running to “The Oak Tree” on the Rogers Road segment of the Backbone Trail, I checked out the upper part of the High Point Trail.

This 2-mile long unofficial, unmaintained, use trail connects the Backbone Trail to the Rivas Canyon Trail. My thought was that I could use the trail to do a variation of the Will Rogers – Temescal Canyon Loop. Instead of running down the lower half of Rogers Road Trail to Will Rogers SHP, I could descend the High Point Trail, pick up the Rivas Canyon Trail, and then finish the loop by the usual route. On paper it made perfect sense.

Steep step in Cretaceous-age cobble on the High Point Trail
Steep step in Cretaceous-age cobble on the High Point Trail

As sometimes happens, it wasn’t quite as straightforward as it looked on the map. Blame the dinosaurs. The trail has several steep sections where eroding Cretaceous-age cobble does its best to take you for a ride. Plus, I happened to be using shoes worn smooth by nearly 500 miles of running.

More than one hiker going up the trail commented about my choice to descend the trail. Being careful not to do anything stoopid, the descent — and the rest of the loop — worked out OK.

Since doing the High Point Trail in the wrong direction and with worn-out shoes, I’ve wanted to go back and do a different loop that climbs UP the trail. That’s what I was doing this morning.

Hazy view of Santa Monica Bay from the High Point Trail
Santa Monica Bay from the High Point Trail

The first half of the run was the same as the Will Rogers – Temescal Canyon Loop. However, instead of continuing to Temescal Canyon on the Rivas Canyon Trail, I picked up the High Point Trail at the “cactus garden.” This is about 11.5 miles into the run. (The start of the High Point Trail has closely-spaced steps that have been eroded by runoff.)

As you might expect, going up the High Point Trail was much better than going down. Care was still required, but it was a far more enjoyable experience. Between the steep sections there was a surprising amount of runnable trail.

Chaparral on the High Point Trail.
Running through chaparral on the High Point Trail.

This time my shoe choice was the HOKA Speedgoat. These have a full-length, sticky-rubber outsole. I’ve had many pairs, and it’s my trail running shoe of choice for more difficult terrain.

From the top of Reseda, the Goat Peak High Point Trail keyhole loop worked out to about 20 miles, with about 3300′ of elevation gain. Here’s an interactive, 3D terrain view of a GPS track of the route, zoomed in on the keyhole part of the loop. The map can be zoomed, tilted, rotated, and panned. To change the view, use the control on the upper right side of the screen. Track and placename locations are approximate and subject to errors. Poor weather, and other conditions may make this route unsuitable for this activity.

Looking For Christmas Berries

Toyon heavily-laden with berries
Toyon along the Garapito Trail (Winter 2019-2020)

A week after doing the out and back run to the Ray Miller Trailhead, I was back in the Santa Monica Mountains and doing another popular trail run — the Trippet Ranch loop. Near the top of the Garapito Trail it dawned on me I’d seen no berries on the toyon shrubs and trees along the way. These red-orange berries usually add a bit of Holiday color to the chaparral, and at one time were so sought after that a law was passed to protect them.

Toyon usually blooms in the Summer, producing green berries that slowly turn red-orange by the holidays. The title photo — of a toyon heavily loaded with berries — is from last Winter.

For the remainder of the run I checked most of the toyon along the trails back to the Top of Reseda. Not a single toyon had any berries.

How widespread was this? The following two weekends, I did runs in other areas of the Santa Monica Mountains. One was an extended version of the Bulldog Loop, and the other an out and back run from the Top of Reseda to the Oak Tree on Rogers Road segment of the Backbone Trail.

On those three runs I must have passed hundreds (thousands?) of toyon along the trail. Out of all of those I checked, only one had berries. It was near the water tank on Mesa Peak Mtwy fire road, at the top of the climb up from Tapia.

As you might expect, the most likely explanation for the lack of berries is the drought. Precipitation records for Downtown Los Angeles (USC) show that in 2019-2020, the rain season lasted about 5 months — from about mid November to mid April. Leading up to the flowering period for toyon the accumulated rainfall was a little above normal. The result was what you see in the title photo.

On the other hand, in 2020-2021, the rain season effectively began at the end of 2020 and ended in mid March. Less than half of normal rainfall was recorded going into the flowering period of toyon.

The toyon on Mesa Peak fire road that managed to produce some berries is situated near the crest of east-west oriented ridge. It probably benefits from enhanced precipitation because of its location.

Some related posts: Christmas Berry on the Garapito Loop, Best Trailhead to Start the Bulldog Loop, Will Rogers – Rivas Canyon – Temescal Canyon Trail Run

Will Rogers – Rivas Canyon – Temescal Canyon Trail Run

Backbone Trail above Will Rogers State Historic Park
Backbone Trail above Will Rogers State Historic Park

The previous weekend I’d done an out and back run from the “Top of Reseda” to the Oak Tree on the Rogers Road segment of the Backbone Trail. It’s an enjoyable run I could do on one bottle of water and get back by mid-morning. Including Temescal Peak, the run was about 14 miles roundtrip, with about 1800′ of elevation gain/loss.

The Oak Tree on the Rogers Road segment of the Backbone Trail
The “Oak Tree” on the Rogers Road segment of the Backbone Trail

This weekend, I hadn’t expected to be back on the Backbone Trail and headed for the Oak Tree again, but last weekend’s run reminded me that I hadn’t done the Will Rogers – Rivas Canyon – Temescal Canyon/Ridge loop in a couple of years.

The 20+ mile loop is an outstanding trail run that is both challenging and scenic. Done clockwise from the Top of Reseda, the run down Rogers Road is as enjoyable as the climb out of Temescal Canyon is difficult. On paper, the elevation gain/loss is around 3400′, but for me the run is usually a bit more strenuous than that stat would suggest.

Century City, Downtown Los Angeles, San Gorgonio Mountain and San Jacinto Peak
Century City, Downtown Los Angeles, San Gorgonio Mountain and San Jacinto Peak

On the way out I usually do a short side trip to Temescal Peak, and on the way back a short detour to Temescal Lookout. With good visibility, both points have extensive, 360-degree views. Temescal Peak can be accessed from the Backbone Trail about 0.1 mile east of Temescal Ridge Fire Road via a use trail. Temescal Lookout is just off the Temescal Ridge Fire Road, about 0.5 mile north of the Trailer Canyon/Temescal Ridge Fire Road junction.

On a clear day, there is a long list of places and peaks visible along the route. Among them are Century City, Downtown, Santa Monica Bay, Palos Verdes, Catalina, Boney Mountain, Hines Peak, San Gabriel Mountains, Mt. Baldy, Santiago Peak, and sometimes San Gorgonio Mountain and San Jacinto Peak.

The steep climb on Temescal Ridge Fire Road up to Green Peak
The steep climb on Temescal Ridge Fire Road up to Green Peak

Water is usually available at Will Rogers State Historic Park at the restrooms adjacent to the main parking lot and polo field. I’ve also topped off my water at the Temescal Canyon trailhead. The Rivas Canyon Trail is used to connect Will Rogers SHP to Temescal Canyon.

Here’s an interactive, 3D terrain view of the Will Rogers – Temescal trail run. The map can be zoomed, tilted, rotated, and panned. To change the view, use the control on the upper right side of the screen. Track and placename locations are approximate and subject to errors. Poor weather, and other conditions may make this route unsuitable for this activity.

Some related posts: Will Rogers – Temescal Loop, Christmas Eve Trail Run, Chilly Los Angeles, Century City Clouds and Sun, Downtown Los Angeles and San Jacinto Peak

After the Palisades Fire – Snake Tracks and Monkeyflowers

Rattlesnake track on Eagle Springs Fire Road following the May 2021 Palisades Fire

The rattlesnake track above was one of several snake tracks on Eagle Springs Fire Road this morning. This area, which is below Eagle Rock in Topanga State Park, was severely burned in the May 2021 Palisades Fire.

This photo of a blooming bush monkeyflower in the same area underscores the resilience of the chaparral biome.

Some related posts: Trippet Ranch Loop After the Palisades Fire, Palisades Fire Perimeter and Some Area Trails

Trippet Ranch Loop After the Palisades Fire

Laurel sumac crown sprouting along Eagle Springs Fire Road
Laurel sumac crown sprouting along Eagle Springs Fire Road

The Palisades Fire began the evening of May 14, 2021 in Santa Ynez Canyon, near Michael Lane in Pacific Palisades. According to the Los Angeles Fire Department Palisades Fire incident page, 1202 acres were burned, one firefighter was injured, 710 structures were threatened, but no structures were damaged or destroyed. The fire was fully contained on May 26.

Most of Topanga State Park was closed as a result of the fire. The Park reopened, with restrictions, on June 11. On June 13, I found myself chugging up the Garapito Trail toward Eagle Rock, and wondering what I was going to find.

I was doing a variation of one of my favorite trail runs in the eastern Santa Monica Mountains — the Trippet Ranch Loop.

This trail run links together several single-track trails and fire roads between Marvin Braude Mulholland Gateway Park (Top of Reseda) and Trippet Ranch. With the addition of an out and back segment on the the Santa Ynez Canyon Trail, the route included all the trails impacted by the fire.

Here are a few photos taken along the way.

Some related posts: Palisades Fire Perimeter and Some Area Trails, Garapito Trail Runs, Trippet Ranch Loop Plus Temescal Peak

Palisades Fire Perimeter and Some Area Trails

Palisades Fire Perimeter and Some Area Trails

Update June 11, 2021. Topanga State Park was reopened with restrictions. See the Park website for details.

According to the Topanga State Park website, all but a small part of the Park is temporarily closed as a result of the Palisades Fire. With the closure of most of the Park, I’ve been curious to see which trails were affected by the fire.

Here’s an interactive, 3D terrain view of the Palisades Fire perimeter along with GPS tracks of some of the trails in the area. The scene can be zoomed, tilted, rotated and panned. Alternatively, here is a Google Earth image of the perimeter and trails.

The perimeter has a timestamp of 2021/05/20 08:36:18+00 and was downloaded from the National Interagency Fire Center(NIFC).

The locations of placemarks, trails, and other data is approximate and subject to error.