Category Archives: wildfire

Interactive 3D Terrain View of Sheep Fire Perimeter, Near Wrightwood

Google Earth image of June 2022 Sheep Fire perimeter, near Wrightwood

Good news! According to the Sheep Fire Incident Page on InciWeb, as of yesterday evening the fire was 90% contained. Full containment is currently projected to be on June 22, 2022 by about 6:00 PM.

The Google Earth image above, and the interactive map linked below, show just how close the fire was to Wrightwood.

Here is an interactive, 3D terrain view of the Sheep Fire perimeter. The perimeter was downloaded from the National Interagency Fire Center this morning. The map can be zoomed, tilted, rotated, and panned. For help controlling the view, click/tap the “?” icon in the upper right corner. Locations are approximate and subject to errors.

Trippet Ranch Loop Plus the Santa Ynez Trail

Creek crossing on the Santa Ynez Canyon Trail

I had just waded down a 50 yard stretch of creek where the Santa Ynez Canyon Trail used to be. Three hikers working up the canyon were trying to find a way past the flooded section without getting their boots wet. That wasn’t going to be easy.

Debris at creek crossing in Santa Ynez Canyon.

I had been doing the same thing higher in the canyon. It was a chilly morning, and I had no great desire to soak my shoes in cold water. The usual rock and limb crossings had worked well until the trail ended in a broad area of flowing creek. Once my shoes were wet, it simplified the process.

That the trail was flooded following several days of rain wasn’t that surprising. What was a surprise is that there hadn’t been higher flows and more damaging flash floods in the canyon.

Creek crossing near the Santa Ynez Canyon Trailhead, on Michael Lane.
Creek crossing near the Santa Ynez Canyon Trailhead

Santa Ynez Canyon was the focus of the Palisades Fire, and a large part of the drainage was burned to a moonscape. Burned slopes often amplify runoff from heavy rain, producing damaging flash floods and debris flows. While there was clearly high flows in the canyon, the levels were less than what I’ve seen in similar circumstances, in other burn areas. One possibility is that unburned trees and brush along the streambed higher in the canyon had attenuated the flow.

After doing the out and back on the Santa Ynez Canyon Trail, I continued down to Trippet Ranch and then, like last week, returned using the Musch, Garapito, and Bent Arrow Trails.

One of several sections of the Bent Arrow Trail damaged by slides. January 2,2022.
Section of the Bent Arrow Trail damaged by a slide

There were a number small rock slides, sluffs, and sediment flows along the trails and roads. A couple of people were working on clearing the limbs and small trees that had fallen across the Garapito Trail. The collapsed oak at the bottom of the Garapito Trail had settled, and was easier to get through this time.

The trail that really took it on the chin was the Bent Arrow Trail. Several sections of the trail were damaged by slides.

I usually do the Santa Ynez Canyon Trail as part of the Trailer Canyon – Santa Ynez – Trippet Ranch Loop. Tacking on the trail as an out and back addition to the loop was slightly shorter, but had a little more elevation gain/loss.

Some related posts: Trippet Ranch Loop After the Palisades Fire, Clouds, Canyons and Wildflowers, Running Between Storms on the Trippet Ranch Loop, Go Figure

Rabbitbrush Along the PCT Near Mt. Hawkins

Rubber rabbitbrush (Ericameria nauseosa) along the PCT, near Mt. Hawkins

From mid Summer into Fall, the vibrant yellow flowers of rabbitbrush add a refreshing hit of color to the greens, grays, and browns of the San Gabriel Mountains.

The title photo was taken along the PCT, at an elevation of about 8600′, near Mt. Hawkins. The area was burned in the 2002 Curve Fire. Here, and elsewhere in the burn area, new trees — now in their teens — are slowly replacing some of the trees lost in the fire.

Related post: Bumblebee Feeding on Rabbitbrush

After the Palisades Fire – Snake Tracks and Monkeyflowers

Rattlesnake track on Eagle Springs Fire Road following the May 2021 Palisades Fire

The rattlesnake track above was one of several snake tracks on Eagle Springs Fire Road this morning. This area, which is below Eagle Rock in Topanga State Park, was severely burned in the May 2021 Palisades Fire.

This photo of a blooming bush monkeyflower in the same area underscores the resilience of the chaparral biome.

Some related posts: Trippet Ranch Loop After the Palisades Fire, Palisades Fire Perimeter and Some Area Trails

Trippet Ranch Loop After the Palisades Fire

Laurel sumac crown sprouting along Eagle Springs Fire Road
Laurel sumac crown sprouting along Eagle Springs Fire Road

The Palisades Fire began the evening of May 14, 2021 in Santa Ynez Canyon, near Michael Lane in Pacific Palisades. According to the Los Angeles Fire Department Palisades Fire incident page, 1202 acres were burned, one firefighter was injured, 710 structures were threatened, but no structures were damaged or destroyed. The fire was fully contained on May 26.

Most of Topanga State Park was closed as a result of the fire. The Park reopened, with restrictions, on June 11. On June 13, I found myself chugging up the Garapito Trail toward Eagle Rock, and wondering what I was going to find.

I was doing a variation of one of my favorite trail runs in the eastern Santa Monica Mountains — the Trippet Ranch Loop.

This trail run links together several single-track trails and fire roads between Marvin Braude Mulholland Gateway Park (Top of Reseda) and Trippet Ranch. With the addition of an out and back segment on the the Santa Ynez Canyon Trail, the route included all the trails impacted by the fire.

Here are a few photos taken along the way.

Some related posts: Palisades Fire Perimeter and Some Area Trails, Garapito Trail Runs, Trippet Ranch Loop Plus Temescal Peak

Palisades Fire Perimeter and Some Area Trails

Palisades Fire Perimeter and Some Area Trails

Update June 11, 2021. Topanga State Park was reopened with restrictions. See the Park website for details.

According to the Topanga State Park website, all but a small part of the Park is temporarily closed as a result of the Palisades Fire. With the closure of most of the Park, I’ve been curious to see which trails were affected by the fire.

Here’s an interactive, 3D terrain view of the Palisades Fire perimeter along with GPS tracks of some of the trails in the area. The scene can be zoomed, tilted, rotated and panned. Alternatively, here is a Google Earth image of the perimeter and trails.

The perimeter has a timestamp of 2021/05/20 08:36:18+00 and was downloaded from the National Interagency Fire Center(NIFC).

The locations of placemarks, trails, and other data is approximate and subject to error.